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Angela Grosvenor http://angelagrosvenor.com Tagline here Mon, 18 Sep 2017 23:36:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4.1 LEADERS WHO SEEK INNOVATION NEED TO CREATE A CULTURE OPEN TO NEW IDEAS http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/09/18/leaders-seek-innovation-need-create-culture-open-new-ideas/ http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/09/18/leaders-seek-innovation-need-create-culture-open-new-ideas/#respond Mon, 18 Sep 2017 23:36:40 +0000 http://angelagrosvenor.com/?p=604 In the business world of past years, companies that created a monopoly on a particular technology such as Polaroid, or a customer market such as Blockbuster, or a universally recognized brand such as Eastman Kodak  were guaranteed to be profitable and successful for many years into the future. However, upheavals in industries due to disruptive...

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In the business world of past years, companies that created a monopoly on a particular technology such as Polaroid, or a customer market such as Blockbuster, or a universally recognized brand such as Eastman Kodak  were guaranteed to be profitable and successful for many years into the future. However, upheavals in industries due to disruptive new technologies, changes in consumer tastes for products and intense competition as markets have opened up to global competitors have created uncertainty and unpredictability where no company can rest on its laurels. Organizations are now must constantly innovate and be open to creative ways of doing things in order to remain competitive and profitable.

These days everything is about innovation. Innovation is not about changing things for the sake of changing, but for the sake of improvement, productivity and bottom line results. Only companies that constantly challenge what they do, challenge themselves to come up with new and different ways of doing things, and constantly improve on the things they already do will survive in today’s globally competitive environment.

Innovation cycles are becoming rapidly shorter, which means that companies have to be constantly on their toes, turning out new products, new services, and often new solutions because customers today don’t just want a product or a service.  They want companies that solve their problems.

Unfortunately many companies lose their most innovative and bright employees because their corporate culture is so stymied in protocols and “the old ways” that managers and leaders are not open to and do not encourage creativity or new ideas. How do leaders of organizations effectively build a culture of innovation and change?

Leaders must be the champions for innovation in their organization.

Innovation and creativity will not flourish in an organization, unless it is actively encouraged, driven by and supported by the highest levels of the organization. People within the organization must be motivated to develop and share innovative ideas and methods.

Typically, the company’s top management is the formulator of the overall mission of the business. They establish the long-term direction, set specific performance objectives, develop strategies to achieve those objectives, and then allocate available resources to the implementation of those plans. It is critical that leaders light the fire in their management teams by continuously pointing out the need for innovation, the desire for creative ideas and getting the leadership team to create a corporate culture that allows innovation and creativity to happen.

Leaders need to create an atmosphere of innovation in their organization

Companies need policies and practices that encourage innovation in order be successful. For a successful innovation program, company leaders must develop collaborative teams that exhibit an entrepreneurial spirit, are functionally diverse, and have a unique perspective of the problem.

The key to creative renewal in organizations is their capacity to create a structure that develops new creative leaders to manage the organization. Organizations that operate from the authoritarian, hierarchical, command and control model, where the top leaders control the work, information, decisions, and allocation of resources, produce employees that are less empowered, less creative, and less productive. This approach to leadership has little chance of bringing innovation and renewal because leaders do not single-handedly lead organizations to greatness.

Successful organizations have discovered that shared and collaborative leadership, rather than single-handed and authoritarian management, is what unlocks the potential of managers to pool their various tools and skills to openly share information to devise creative and innovative problem solving methods. Everyone in the organization needs to feel that they are involved in the leadership of the organization.

Leaders should encourage diversity and inclusion to foster creativity and innovation.

The paths to advancement used to be closed to people of certain ethnic persuasions, women and those that were not perceived as “ivy league material.” Like-minded people, however, are not conducive to the spirit of innovation. Diversity lies at the heart of innovation. Innovation comes from people who think outside of the box and approach problems from a different perspective. As such, leaders must foster an appreciation for and insist on inclusion of people from all walks of life.

When the social structure of the organization helps workers feel secure, valued and accepted, it encourages creativity and innovation. People are willing to give more of themselves for an organization they truly believe in and enjoy working for. Consequently, organizational leaders must respect, value, and harness the richness of ideas, backgrounds, and perspectives of every employee and allow them to use their unique personal assets and experiences to work for the organization.

Leaders must create a safe haven where it is safe to fail.

People who cling to past and assume that the way the organization functioned in the past is the way it must always function do so out of a fear of failure. New ideas and ways of doing things create the risk that you might fail in your efforts. Rarely do innovative, new ideas that have been implemented in an organization find success on the first try. Steve Jobs, the innovative CEO of Apple, had many product failures before the I-mac, I-phone and I-watch or other successful Apple products achieved success in the marketplace. However, in Apple’s culture, failure was viewed as an opportunity to rise to the challenge and try again.

Creative leaders are able to embrace change and encourage every employee in the organization to question why the organization does things a certain way and seek out ways of doing it differently to solve a problem. Mistakes must be treated as part of the learning curve and employees who try new ideas and fail should not be “punished”.

Leaders need to be sure to reward creative and innovative managers and employees

Find reasons to recognize employees who go above the average in their performance and praise them in front of their peers and department at the next department meeting. It motivates them to try harder so they experience that feeling of pride again and it motivates others in the department to step up their game so they, too, can be recognized.

In order for an organization to move out of the “old ways” into a more competitive and innovative company, leaders need to pave the way.

As  a leader, do you recall saying: “We’ve always done it this way, and it works.”  If so, how is that working for you?

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Core Values and Motivators for Leadership Roles http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/08/29/core-values-motivators-leadership-roles/ http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/08/29/core-values-motivators-leadership-roles/#respond Tue, 29 Aug 2017 15:00:31 +0000 http://angelagrosvenor.com/?p=595 Core Values and Motivators for Leadership Roles The Leadership Forecast Values Report describes your core values and goals and how they can affect your career.  What are the things that are most important to you in your career? What are the goals and values that motivate you? And what type of an organization would be...

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Core Values and Motivators for Leadership Roles

The Leadership Forecast Values Report describes your core values and goals and how they can affect your career.  What are the things that are most important to you in your career? What are the goals and values that motivate you? And what type of an organization would be the best fit for all of this? If you are a career women executive or a high potential, read on.

In this third and final installment of my series on Hogan assessments (if you missed them, be sure to go back and read part 1  and part 2 ), we’ll look at an assessment that can help you answer these questions: the Hogan Motives, Values & Preferences Inventory. Leaders are most effective when they work within an environment that supports and fits the things that are important to them. Sometimes I use this assessment to help people assess their next career move. Other times I use it to help them identify key steps to take to help make their current organization a better fit for them .

The Motives, Values & Preferences Inventory shows how you score on a wide variety of factors. Here is what high scores in eight of these areas means:

  • Recognition – You want to be seen, and you want people to notice and publically acknowledge the contributions that you make.
  • Power – You want to succeed. You don’t just desire to make things happen, you also want to do better than your competition. 
  • Hedonism – Yes, you work hard. But you’re not all work and no play—you also want to have fun. 
  • Aesthetics – You appreciate style, and it’s important to you that the end product looks, feels and sounds good. 
  • Tradition – You’re happiest working for a company that values church, family and appropriate social behavior.
  • Science – You care deeply about technology and data, and you want to know how things work. 
  • Commerce – In your quest to earn money you’re always on the lookout for new business opportunities. 
  • Security – You really dislike uncertainty, so you’re happiest in an organization that’s both predictable and structured.

As with the other Hogan assessments, there are no right or wrong answers here. Your scores will help you see what type of an organization will resonate with you. In determining what would be a good fit we look at both the high scores and the low scores, as they both have potential downsides, and we also correlate this with the results from the other two tests.

For example, say you’re a software engineer and you scored low on “power” on the Motives, Values & Preferences Inventory, low on “sociability” on the Hogan Personality Inventory and high on “reserved” on the Hogan Development Survey. Chances are, none of these things are an issue in your current job. However, they could all pose problems if you’re interested in taking on a managerial role.

The information in this report will help you understand yourself a little bit better and your values-driven tendencies.  Do not underestimate your values when looking for your next job!

 

 

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Delving Into Your Dark Side Tools for Executive Women Leaders http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/08/11/delving-dark-side-tools-executive-women-leaders/ http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/08/11/delving-dark-side-tools-executive-women-leaders/#respond Fri, 11 Aug 2017 15:10:35 +0000 http://angelagrosvenor.com/?p=589 As I explained in my previous blog on how others see you, there’s a series of assessments that I like to use in my coaching practice to give leaders vital insight into themselves. My favorite is the Hogan Development Survey, which looks at your dark side. What are the things that tend to derail you,...

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As I explained in my previous blog on how others see you, there’s a series of assessments that I like to use in my coaching practice to give leaders vital insight into themselves. My favorite is the Hogan Development Survey, which looks at your dark side. What are the things that tend to derail you, i.e. those characteristics that tend to turn into negatives when you’re under stress?

Why do I like this assessment so much? Because many people don’t realize that the same characteristics that can be great strengths can also be their downfall. For example, I have always been very ambitious and driven. The Hogan Development Survey helped me see that this ambition is not always a positive, because when I’m under stress it can cause me to walk all over the rest of the project team.

The Hogan Development Survey measures a long list of traits, including:

  • Skeptical – Some people seem to doubt everything that others say, get overly pessimistic and think there’s an ulterior motive for everything. Yes, it’s good to question things. But when it gets to the point where you are an obstruction, this skepticism becomes a problem.
  • Cautious – Those who score high in this area exhibit a lack of decisiveness and have a hard time making judgement calls. I’ve seen this in managers who worry so much that they fail to make decisions at all.
  • Reserved – This trait is applied to those who might prefer to be isolated and on their own. For some jobs this is fine. But if you’re a leader, you need to get out there and interact with the people you are leading.
  • Leisurely – Unlike what you might expect, this trait is applied to people who have a hard time saying “no” and just tell you what you want to hear. They can be very charming and independent, but their credibility and effectiveness are low.
  • Bold – These are people who tend to have such high self-esteem that they don’t care much about the opinions of others. They’re operating on their own agenda without opening the door to hear any feedback or taking steps to make others feel part of things.
  • Dutiful – This trait is applied to people who are always looking for excessive amounts of approval. As an executive you need to be independent, able to move forward on things without someone above you saying it’s okay.

The Hogan Personality Inventory looks at your bright side. The Hogan Development Survey looks at your dark side. In the final part of this three-part series I’ll introduce the Hogan Motives, Values & Preferences Inventory, which looks at the things that are important to you.

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How Do Others See You? – An interesting insight for Executive Leaders http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/07/14/others-see-interesting-insight-executive-leaders/ http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/07/14/others-see-interesting-insight-executive-leaders/#respond Fri, 14 Jul 2017 01:08:19 +0000 http://angelagrosvenor.com/?p=573 Ever wonder how others in your organization see you? There’s an interesting way you can find out—without even asking them! It’s called the Hogan Personality Inventory, and it’s part of a series of assessments that I like to use in my coaching practice to give executives vital insight into themselves. Like most such assessment devices,...

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Ever wonder how others in your organization see you? There’s an interesting way you can find out—without even asking them! It’s called the Hogan Personality Inventory, and it’s part of a series of assessments that I like to use in my coaching practice to give executives vital insight into themselves.

Like most such assessment devices, taking the Hogan Personality Inventory involves answering a series of questions. What’s unique about this test, though, is that its results are based on empirical data that says “people who answer this way are seen in this way by the people who work with them.” This test looks at who you are and how you present yourself on a day-to-day basis. It provides insight into your reputation and strengths.

What are your qualities that will help you succeed?

The Hogan Personality Inventory looks at how you are when you’re at your best. The scores it provides for you on a long list of character traits (referred to as “descriptors”) can be quite enlightening, and can help you create a list of areas that you want to address.

Some of the most important things that the Hogan Personality Inventory assesses are:

  • Ambition – The degree to which you are competitive and energetic.
  • Sociability – How comfortable you are in social situations; how much you enjoy interactions with others.
  • Interpersonal sensitivity – The degree to which you’re seen as being thoughtful and socially sensitive.
  • Prudence – Whether or not you’re seen as being dependable and conscientious in your work and interactions.
  • Inquisitive – If others see you as being bright and creative, the type of person that always asks questions and is curious about others.
  • Learning approach – If you’re the type of person who seems to enjoy academic activities and learning just for the sheer joy of learning.

All of these descriptors are related to adjustment, meaning the degree to which you appear confident and stable under pressure. An important thing to keep in mind, though, is that none of these things are inherently “good” or “bad.” In fact, the same traits that can help you succeed can also derail you when you’re under stress. Low scores indicate areas in which you may be weak. Scores that are much higher than 50% represent areas you want to keep an eye on because you might be too strong. Scores that are right around the 50% point represent areas where you are “just right.”

The Hogan Personality Inventory looks at your bright side. In the next article in this three-part series I’ll introduce an assessment that delves into your dark side. Stay tuned!

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Using Emotional Intelligence In The Workplace – Tips for Women Executive leaders http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/07/07/using-emotional-intelligence-workplace-tips-women-executive-leaders/ http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/07/07/using-emotional-intelligence-workplace-tips-women-executive-leaders/#respond Fri, 07 Jul 2017 03:14:58 +0000 http://angelagrosvenor.com/?p=568 If you bring up the idea of emotional intelligence in a business setting and you may well be met with some scepticism. Many people believe that Emotional Intelligence is simply a buzz word that has taken HR departments across the world by storm. However, since the early 1990’s there has been a steadily growing body...

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If you bring up the idea of emotional intelligence in a business setting and you may well be met with some scepticism. Many people believe that Emotional Intelligence is simply a buzz word that has taken HR departments across the world by storm. However, since the early 1990’s there has been a steadily growing body of evidence that suggests that emotional intelligence or ‘EI’ for short, may well be the best predictor of both employee and workplace success.

Emotional intelligence can be defined simply as ‘the ability to recognise and understand our own and other emotions’.  From a practical perspective this means that emotionally intelligent people are keenly aware of how their emotions can drive their behaviours and how those behaviours can impact others. It is about having an intuitive ability to effectively manage these emotions – their own and others – especially in times of high stress.

The importance of having a high level of personal and workplace emotional intelligence is highlighted by a series of recent scientific investigations that suggest that ‘EI’ may even trump ‘IQ’ as a predictor of success.

Recent research by the Center for Creative Leadership in the States stated that the three primary reasons for underperformance or failure among the 2000+ organisations that they serve are poor interpersonal relationships, poor teamwork and an inability to effectively handle change.

Furthermore, Nobel laurate and renowned psychologist Daniel Kahneman discovered that individuals would much rather engage in business with people that they trust and that they personally like – even if somebody they don’t particularly trust is offering a cheaper product or better service.

Lastly, consider the last time that you purchased an item of high value such as a car, a house or a large home appliance. Visualise the person who guided you through the sales process; it is highly likely that the person was somebody who you trusted, somebody who built rapport – somebody who was emotionally intelligent.  In fact, I can share with you that a month ago when I bought a car, my salesperson said to me: “I know exactly what you are looking for Angela, I will drive it and bring it up upfront”.  I answered: “what if I don’t like it?”, he said: “You will”.  The car had everything I wanted it.  Not only is he an amazing salesperson, but he truly built such a rapport that created a relationship of trust.

So how do we go about using emotional intelligence in the workplace? EI can be broken down into four key components and mastering these is the key to becoming a more emotionally intelligent individual.

  • Self-Awareness

Becoming more emotionally intelligent all starts with the concept of self-awareness.  Individuals who possess a high degree of self-awareness have a decent understanding of ways of their own emotions. One can begin by identifying times when you feel stressed, your strengths, your weaknesses, your passions and aspirations. It can be helpful to keep a journal of your emotions and thoughts at hand throughout the day and jot down anything that you experience. Notice the triggers that set you off and recognize them so you don’t react the same negative way each time.  I remember a word that a manager loved to use in the past.  Once I identified it, I also became more curious to understand why it would set me off.  It helped!

  • Self-Regulation

As humans we all have emotions that can drive us in less than optimal directions. A large part of using your emotional intelligence in the workplace is to become skilled at effectively managing our emotions so that they do not control us. Once you start to recognise your emotional landscape through self-awareness you can become more attuned to the powerful effect that unwelcome emotions can have on your behaviour; but this where you realize that you have a choice. Negative emotions can create a turbulent and sea within your mind and body, becoming emotionally intelligent is about realising that while you can’t avoid the stormy waves, you can learn to surf them. Next time you feel a surge of negative feelings, wait until they pass before acting rashly.

  • Empathy

Empathy is one of the pillars of emotional intelligence; somebody who has a deep understanding of the feelings of others and how these feelings drive their actions. As an emotionally intelligent individual, you should not be considered a ‘softie’ who fears hurting the feelings of others but rather as a person who is willing to evaluate and consider the emotional impact of tough and necessary decisions that have to be made. Emotionally intelligent people are willing to openly share their feelings, worries and hopes and also to recognise those same features in others. The next time that you see a furious co-worker, try to respond in a manner that soothes and seeks to understand. Put yourself into their shoes.

  • Interpersonal Skills

Interpersonal skills are central to the becoming emotionally intelligent in the workplace. The three aforementioned skills are a prerequisite to attaining a high level of interpersonal skills and additionally one is required to develop the ability to find common ground with people with a diverse range of backgrounds and personalities. The ability to collaborate, to bring groups into cohesion, to connect, build rapport and network are all critical for success in the business world and are some of the hallmark characteristics of emotionally intelligent people.

The weight of the available evidence suggests that levels of emotional intelligence are highly correlated with business and personal success.  Using emotional intelligence in the workplace is no easy task, however the potential benefits are enormous. Every aspect of modern business form customer service to board presentations can be improved by increasing the personal levels of emotional intelligence within the office environment. Working to improve the four key skills mentioned in this article; self-awareness, self-regulation, empathy and interpersonal skills will not only contribute to greater levels of  success for you and your business, but also make you a happier, more rounded and more fully developed individual.

 

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Ways to Empower Your Direct Reports – Tips for Executive Women Leaders http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/06/29/4-ways-to-empower-your-direct-reports/ http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/06/29/4-ways-to-empower-your-direct-reports/#respond Thu, 29 Jun 2017 02:36:43 +0000 http://angelagrosvenor.com/?p=553 As I discussed in my last blog, empowered employees are better employees. They’re more motivated, more productive, more vested in the organization’s success, and more likely to do much better work. So how do you go about empowering your direct reports? Here are four proven ways that have worked for me in the past: 1....

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As I discussed in my last blog, empowered employees are better employees. They’re more motivated, more productive, more vested in the organization’s success, and more likely to do much better work. So how do you go about empowering your direct reports? Here are four proven ways that have worked for me in the past:

1. Open the lines of communication – Don’t just formulate plans and inform your staff that this is what they have to do. Solicit their input, too. Share the big picture of what you’re trying to accomplish and your ideas on how to get there, and then make it clear that you want to consider their ideas as well. Opening the lines of communication and making your direct reports part of the decision-making process is the first step towards empowerment. You’re essentially telling them, “You matter, and I care what you have to say.”

2. Reward participation – Whenever you empower people to do more and bring more, let them know that they’ll be rewarded, either with recognition (often the most successful reward) or something tangible. On the flip side, don’t punish people for making mistakes. Make it safe for them to bring forward their ideas and try new things.

3. Show them a bigger future – Let people know that you’re not just empowering them to do better in their current role, you’re thinking about their future with the organization as well. Whenever you talk about what a person’s job is, also paint the picture of how much bigger their role can be. For example, “This is your position as a Billing Clerk. You’re a great Billing Clerk, and I’m very pleased with your work. Looking down the road, I’d like to see you move up to Accounting Supervisor, and here’s how we’ll get you there.”

4. Appreciate their contributions –Make sure employees understand that their contributions to the company are valued. Build up their self-esteem. Remind them about what they’re capable of, and the impact they have. For example, you can tell the receptionist that his job is just to answer the phones and make coffee. Or you can talk about the big difference he makes because he is responsible for potential clients’ first impressions of your company.
Of course, this list is just a start, as there are many ways to empower your direct reports and other employees. Once you do, the excitement will be contagious, and the entire company will benefit.

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Steps for Creating Executive Presence for Executive Women http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/06/25/3-steps-creating-executive-presence-executive-women/ http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/06/25/3-steps-creating-executive-presence-executive-women/#respond Sun, 25 Jun 2017 05:22:01 +0000 http://angelagrosvenor.com/?p=550 It used to be that the first step in creating executive presence was to dress the part. Now many executives find that wearing a business suit just isn’t appropriate in their organizations. Which raises the question: How do you create an executive presence in today’s business world? Three important steps for creating executive presence Building...

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It used to be that the first step in creating executive presence was to dress the part. Now many executives find that wearing a business suit just isn’t appropriate in their organizations. Which raises the question: How do you create an executive presence in today’s business world?

Three important steps for creating executive presence
Building an executive presence is a multi-part process. Here’s what I recommend:

1. Portray confidence and competence – Your knowledge and expertise, whether in running this particular business or others, can help create executive presence in and of itself. People around you know you’re not just giving orders; you understand the subject and why those directions are appropriate.

Even if you’re 24 years old and don’t have years of executive experience you can still portray confidence and competence. After all, something got you to this place. Leverage those strengths and skills to show that you have what it takes to successfully lead the organization.

2. Interact and connect – If you’re hiding in your office all day you essentially have no presence. Taking this approach can be dangerous. The reason why we as managers get hired is our expertise, skills and vision. If you stop interacting and relating to others in the organization, your vision will get lost. You also risk losing touch to the point where people no longer see you as the leader, or you take the company in the wrong direction altogether.

Part of connecting is having the charisma and demeanor to draw others to you and make them feel comfortable interacting with you. Be interested in the people who work with you. And don’t keep your passion and excitement about the business to yourself! Your passion can ignite excitement in others, and inspire great things.

3. Exhibit both decisiveness and flexibility – As the leader, you cannot be afraid to make decisions, and you must be able to take some risk. Should the organization move forward with an initiative or project or not. Why? You need to show your team that you can weigh the input, make a decision and stick with it. Unless circumstances change, in which case you need to be flexible and reassess the situation and the decision.

If you’re an executive, you need to think about how you present yourself. Whether it is good or bad, your executive presence affects peoples’ perceptions of you, and significant impacts your ability to successfully lead.

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Delegation of Authority http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/01/25/delegation/ http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/01/25/delegation/#respond Wed, 25 Jan 2017 23:49:58 +0000 http://angelagrosvenor.com/?p=276 There is a temptation among some well-intentioned leaders and otherwise competent executives, to feel that delegation of authority is somehow neglecting their own position. Leaders can sometimes feel wary passing along duties to direct reports because they feel they can “handle it themselves just fine,” that it might be mishandled by someone else, or that...

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There is a temptation among some well-intentioned leaders and otherwise competent executives, to feel that delegation of authority is somehow neglecting their own position. Leaders can sometimes feel wary passing along duties to direct reports because they feel they can “handle it themselves just fine,” that it might be mishandled by someone else, or that they simply feel it’s unnecessary or even rude asking someone else to do these particular things.

But understanding delegation and duty distribution as empowering to the individuals you entrust with those decisions and tasks, will make you realize that empowering direct reports is satisfying.

One of the best ways to view your direct reports in an empowering light is to remember that they are a reflection and a testament to your own success as a manager. If you hold them back through your own fears and limited thinking, or through your inability to delegate and trust them to perform, it will reflect on you even worse than the occasional failures that do occur as a result of regular delegation.

Also, in the long run, you want to empower your direct reports to someday take on a leadership role such as your own. You need to ask yourself if the example you’re setting will empower them to become a good leader themselves? Obviously you would hope that if they were ever in the position, particularly within your own company, that they would be a leader who empowers their direct reports, so it benefits and empowers you both to remember to be one yourself.

People remember this type of empowering leadership. In Harvard Business Review, Russell Sy talks about and compliments this characteristic of his direct supervisor, and says that “constantly observing her delegate, motivate, and manage for results has taught me a lot.”

This is the effect of empowering management in action. This creates a culture of self-perpetuating empowerment, and encourages employees to feel valued and to return this in kind with loyalty and better performance.

Contrast this with the fact that according to a Gallup study, “about 50% of the 7,200 adults surveyed left a job ‘to get away from their manager.’” In this same survey these employees said they felt “like they’re given little guidance for understanding what’s expected of them,” with only 12% saying they felt they were given priorities, and some form of goal-setting and expectations.

All of this underscores how important it is to intelligently delegate to empower your direct reports. This helps ensure that you’re leaving both them and you satisfied with the leadership lineage you’ve provided, rather than them leaving the company with the feeling they were never empowered there to begin with.

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Is lack of Delegation one of those bad habits that you might not be noticing? As your MGSSC Executive/leadership Coach, I can help you identify unrecognized habits that might be keeping you from getting to the next level.  If you are ready to take your career to the next level, schedule a complimentary session at calendly.com/angela-grosvenor or e-mail me at angela.grosvenor@sccoaching.com.

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How to Utilize Leadership Growth in Your Everyday Office Life http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/01/25/ways-to-utilize-leadership-growth-in-your-everyday-office-life/ http://angelagrosvenor.com/2017/01/25/ways-to-utilize-leadership-growth-in-your-everyday-office-life/#respond Wed, 25 Jan 2017 23:47:44 +0000 http://angelagrosvenor.com/?p=273 Do you feel like you are just another fly in a cubicle inside your office with little to no ways to practice personal growth? Utilizing ways of becoming a leader are sometimes difficult to practice or incorporate in a pretty simple routine. Here are a few ideas on how to incorporate leadership growth into your office lifestyle....

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Do you feel like you are just another fly in a cubicle inside your office with little to no ways to practice personal growth? Utilizing ways of becoming a leader are sometimes difficult to practice or incorporate in a pretty simple routine. Here are a few ideas on how to incorporate leadership growth into your office lifestyle.

1) Ask your boss about new opportunities

Without making it sound like a complaint, express your concern about leadership to your boss. Remember to do it in a way that would be helpful to the office as a whole, and not just for your own need for personal growth. Every office has an area that management would like to work on and use this as an opportunity for a deeper calling to your spirit for personal growth.

2) Take a good hard look at where things need improvement in your office

As I stated in number one, every office has an area that management would like to work on. Sometimes it is driving in new customers, sometimes it is making up for a loss in the company or a job. Offer to use your ideas to help improve the issues that are going on.

3) Come up with a new tradition to change attitudes

Coffee and donuts on Fridays, random “thank you” cards to those that go above and beyond, or a group luncheon once a week. These are all simple acts that improve moral but show others that you have great leadership skills. Earn respect in the office through kindness and pleasing those around you. Like that old saying goes “You get honey with sugar and not vinegar”. Not suggesting that bribery is a good way to go about things, make sure whatever gesture you use is sincere and from the heart.

4) Do not be afraid to get to know your co-workers more personally

Creating a more unified environment is a great way to show off your abilities. It is also a great way to see where others fit in. Everyone has a specific love language or way they open up to others and getting to know the people around you not only creates opportunities for you, but it can also create opportunities for them.

5) Utilize a planner for tracking your inner leader

Every day we can get caught in the same old routines and not allow ourselves to grow to our potential. Make yourself a new habit by practicing something fresh every single day. Keep a tracker so you can look back and see how much progress you have made and maybe decide where to go from there.

Everyone has a leader inside of them. Whether they want to open it up or not depends on not only who they are, but the effort they put forth into their everyday lives.

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Are you ready to unlock your potential? Is it about time to make yourself notice and start growing professionally?  As your MGSSC Executive/leadership Coach, I can help you develop those critical leadership skills that will help you create a strong personal and professional brand.  If you are ready to take your career to the next level, schedule a complimentary session at calendly.com/angela-grosvenor or e-mail me at angela.grosvenor@sccoaching.com.

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